Tag: architecture

A Trip to Wonderland

A Trip to Wonderland

By on 8 November, 2017 in Sandra Nickel with 0 Comments

Before embarking on my 36-year real estate career, I spent some time in the field of marketing and advertising. And it was during this time that I was introduced to and fell in love with the architecture variously identified as International Style, Minimalist and Modernist. A failed architecture student turned graphic artist came to work […]

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Mid-Century Modern Is Alive and Well!

Mid-Century Modern Is Alive and Well!

By on 14 February, 2017 in Architecture, Carole King, Fun, Historic Midtown with 1 Comment

Is history of no interest to you? Do you consider old houses and the things in them stuffy and boring? Are flea markets and antique malls a waste of your time and interest? Well, prepare to be surprised! The Landmarks Foundations’ newest architectural adventure will be a tour of homes featuring Montgomery’s Mid-Century Modern design. […]

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What’s a Lockwood?

What’s a Lockwood?

By on 25 September, 2014 in Architecture, Carole King, Historic Midtown with 1 Comment

With the recent news that the Standard Club located on Narrow Lane Road will have a new life as a hospice facility, local preservationists are breathing a collective sigh of relief. The Standard Club was designed by noted Montgomery architect Frank Lockwood and built in 1929. You may have heard that name batted around in […]

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The Rock House

The Rock House

Those of us who live in Midtown’s Garden District, Old Cloverdale or Cloverdale-Idlewild neighborhoods love “old house quirk.” We admire built-ins with glass paned windows, transoms, elaborate molding and period tile. But sometimes we can be a bit standoffish when it comes to more modern design. Some people love mixing midcentury furnishings with their hundred-year-old […]

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Alabama National Fair

Alabama National Fair

A lot of prose has been devoted over the years to talking about the annual county fair as some great symbol of autumn, waxing poetic about the waxing harvest moon, and considerable carrying on about agricultural festivals, celebrating the start of the march into winter. While all of that is great in its own cliched […]

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Work Programs and Stimulus Monies (75+ years later)….

With the discussion of national work programs on everybody’s minds as a relief to our trouble economy, a little retrospective came to mind as we pay homage to one of our most important research tools used in the historic preservation movement, the Historic American Building Survey. In 1933, deep into the Great Depression, the Federal […]

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