Tag: civil rights

Four Little Girls: Birmingham 1963

Four Little Girls: Birmingham 1963

By on 28 January, 2019 in Art, Kate and Stephen with 0 Comments

For the first time in the history of the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, there are two plays by the same playwright (other than Shakespeare, of course) being performed in the repertory. On Friday, we attended the premiere of the first of them, Four Little Girls: Birmingham 1963 by Christina Ham. We both think that it may […]

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Freedom Riders Museum

Freedom Riders Museum

By on 4 April, 2018 in Kate and Stephen with 0 Comments

In an era of an infinite sea of always-available television shows, music and movies, it’s increasingly rare to be denied an entertainment experience. If you know where to stream or download (and pay, at least in theory, for the appropriate licenses), you can pretty much grab any information or diversion at any time. That’s why […]

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Remembering Judge Johnson

Remembering Judge Johnson

By on 19 January, 2015 in Government, Holidays, Kate and Stephen, Legal Issues with 2 Comments

In the Montgomery airport, there’s a new advertisement for the movie Selma, which was shot partly right here in town. The movie’s advertising slogan reads “One dream can change the world.” That’s catchy, and clearly calls back to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous speech at the 1963 March on Washington. Unfortunately, it reflects a common […]

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Spring Civil Rights Anniversaries Will Be Epic

Spring Civil Rights Anniversaries Will Be Epic

By on 12 January, 2015 in Lynne Schneider with 0 Comments

This year, Montgomery’s past becomes a present-day chance for enrichment, culturally and economically. The city celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Selma marches that led to passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. This spring, Montgomery is the place to be. In March, tourists will revisit all three of the 1965 marches from Bloody Sunday […]

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The Graetz Neighborhood Dedication

The Graetz Neighborhood Dedication

By on 3 March, 2011 in City Living, Historic Midtown, Sandra Nickel with 1 Comment

I have twice become nearly overcome with guilt about my youthful attitude to race relations. The first time, Congressman John Lewis had come to town for the dedication of an historic marker at the Greyhound Bus Station downtown location on South Court Street. Lewis was among the Freedom Riders who were beaten when a Greyhound […]

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