Tag: Governor’s Mansion

Mockingbirds and Mansions

Mockingbirds and Mansions

Whether you own property, pay monthly rent, or are just crashing on a friend’s couch until you can get some things together, I’ve got some good news: You have a beautiful house. Sure, the idea of the Alabama Governor’s Mansion as “The People’s House” is more civic metaphor than legal truth. But there’s still power […]

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Conservation Projects with Surprises at the Governor’s Mansion

Conservation Projects with Surprises at the Governor’s Mansion

By on 18 June, 2014 in Art, Carole King, Historic preservation with 2 Comments

Restoration of the public rooms of the Governor’s Mansion continues with the completion of two art conservation projects. Recently, First Lady Dianne Bentley presided over the unveiling of the newly conserved painting in the Mansion’s historic collection, Mountain Tops in Snow, painted by Thomas Moran in 1878 and donated to the Mansion in 1977. The […]

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Christmas at the Governor’s Mansion

Christmas at the Governor’s Mansion

On Monday, the holiday spirit moved us. Well, to be fair, the promise of getting a look inside the Governor’s Mansion moved us. But we also can’t say no to a festive display this time of year. Even after living in Montgomery for years and driving by the mansion on Perry just about every single […]

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New Legislation Protects Governor’s Mansion

New Legislation Protects Governor’s Mansion

The Alabama and Montgomery especially historic preservation and museum community scored a huge accomplishment in the 2011 Legislative session with House Bill 437. The First Lady Dianne Bentley Governor’s Mansion Preservation Act was introduced by Rep. Jeremy Oden of Eva and Mrs. Bentley’s support was instrumental in the passage of the bill, working closely with […]

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The Academic or Eclectic Styles: Neo-Classical

The Academic or Eclectic Styles: Neo-Classical

The turn of the twentieth century was an exciting time for architecture. Prosperity meant that people had money to spend on new houses and buildings while paying people to design them. Public and higher education was available to more people, and for the first time, academically trained architects were available beyond the east coast bastions […]

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